From a Doctor she could sort of control, because he had a crush on her, she’s landed with a Doctor who barely registers that she’s a girl. They’re great friends and all that but she has to be his human interface with everybody else.

Clara and the Doctor according to Steven Moffat (from SFX)

Seriously where does he see examples of Clara controlling Eleven?

(via pygmy-of-triviality)

(via pygmy-of-triviality)

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I'm sorry. I've just gotta inquire how you find the "Don't you think she looks tired?" line to be sexist? The idea of judging her appearance was solely due to how stressed she appeared. Her face was drawn, worn out, she didn't look to be fit for the position. The same could've been said for any male in office that had similarities, the fact she was a female under the scrutiny though, makes it sexist?
whovianfeminism whovianfeminism Said:

I need everyone to stop what you are doing and listen to this podcast right now. Just put it on in the background while you’ll scrolling through Tumblr. You’ll thank me when the podcast is over and you realize you’ve been staring at the same page for 30 minutes because you’ve been listening so intently to this podcast.

This podcast is about silent villains, but it is about so much more than that. It’s about how language and the ability to communicate can make—or break—a villain, and how the lack of communication influences how we interact with a character. There is an INCREDIBLY interesting section near the end about how language is used as a tool of colonization and oppression. There is also a really fascinating section about gender, how the companions interact with the Doctor, and how they are often the ones that reach out to characters who would otherwise remain silent.

So I need you all to listen to this because I have a lot of thoughts about this but they’re not coherent enough for a post yet, and I’d like to hear your thoughts!

Asker Anonymous Asks:
I really liked your post about role models, however I'm surprised and a bit confused by the fact that you didn't mention (or didn't see at all?) any problems with Drago, the evil villain, being the only PoC, and how problematic he was written. Also stuff like the fact that Valka didn't actually get to do anything, she just got saved by the guys. Don't get me wrong, I adore HTTYD, and I completely understand that the post wasn't a HTTYD2 review, but I still thought that you'd mention some of ->
whovianfeminism whovianfeminism Said:

-> the issues with the second movie, since they were actually sort of a big deal? (compared to the first movie that was pretty damn perfect except for some lack of representation). Anyway, I love your blog and your DW analyses, keep up the good work! :)

Well, as you noted, my post wasn’t actually a review of HTTYD2. I happened to see the movie after a twitter conversation about the idea that the Doctor is the only positive role model for boys, and was inspired to begin my discussion of that idea by discussing Hiccup’s characterization.

If you’d like to read about the problems with Drago, check out “Why Is the Villain in Dragon 2 the Only Non-White Character?

If you’d like to read about the problems with Valka, check out “We’re losing all our Strong Female Characters to Trinity Syndrome.”

EDIT: Okay, LOTS of pushback on the Trinity Syndrome article, which I guess I should’ve expected. I actually agree with all of your criticisms, and I was mostly recommending it in the sense of “If you’re interested in this conversation, this is a good place to start.” I should probably have concluded that sentence with: “And this is a good counter-criticism of that idea.

I absolutely adore the How to Train Your Dragon franchise. Both movies are full of heart and have some of the most fascinating, nuanced, well developed characters I’ve ever seen in a movie targeted at children. Also, they have dragons. Really, they could’ve stopped after animating Toothless and I would’ve been happy.

But for those of us who are hyper aware of gender dynamics in media, HTTYD is an absolute delight. The entirety of the first movie was a subversion of gender tropes in media from start to finish. The movie showed us an egalitarian society where men and women were considered fully equal without making a big deal of it. Astrid was clearly the most best fighter of the group, but no comments were made within the movie about how she was exceptional or rare as a woman for this trait.

The relationship between Astrid and Hiccup also defied traditional gender dynamics in media. Astrid occupied the traditional male movie role: she was the strong fighter working to overcome her fears, develop her skills, and become the most powerful warrior in her village. It’s Hiccup’s job to teach her the value of empathy and compassion, and he ultimately encourages her to accept her village’s traditional enemies: dragons.

The second movie was equally as good as the first. Five years after the first movie ended, Hiccup is still viewed as an unconventional leader in his community. While everyone around him believes war with this movie’s villain, Drago Bludvist, is inevitable, he still attempts to negotiate for peace. 

Drago is presented as a dark parallel to Hiccup. Both grew up viewing dragons as their enemy, and both have been hurt in various ways by dragons. But while Hiccup reacted with empathy, attempting to understand and befriend dragons, Drago reacted with violence. He dominates and controls them through aggression and brute force. Without giving too much away, Hiccup is ultimately able to defeat Drago by displaying the trust and love that he and Toothless have for each other. 

In short, Hiccup and the entire HTTYD franchise challenge ideas about masculinity and femininity. Both men and women can be strong warriors, and both can be empathetic and gentle. Hiccup is a hero because he is thoughtful, intelligent, compassionate and kind, not because he is violent and aggressive.

All of this is a very long, roundabout way of saying that I don’t buy the argument that the Doctor should only ever be portrayed by a man because the Doctor is the only positive role model for boys.

The typical argument asserts that the Doctor “is the only non-violent ‘superhero’ male role model" because he solves his conflicts by being clever and kind, not by being violent or aggressive. I’ve always found this argument to be a bit perplexing. Sure, the Doctor is a wonderful role model in this regard. Steven Moffat (and yes, I do think he sometimes says wonderfully brilliant things), summed it up best when he said:

When they made this particular hero, they didn’t give him a gun, they gave him a screwdriver to fix things. They didn’t give him a tank or a warship or an x-wing fighter, they gave him a call box from which you can call for help. And the didn’t give him a superpower or pointy ears or a heat ray, they gave him an extra heart. They gave him two hearts.

These qualities make the Doctor exceptional, but not necessarily unique. Most of the media I grew up with featured a male protagonist whose strength came from compassion and love, and who defeated his enemies by being clever and kind instead of being violent. And this type of model is increasingly common.

One of my earliest childhood heroes was Luke Skywalker. I remember being stuck on a long camping trip as a kid with nothing but the original trilogy to entertain myself and watching those movies a dozen times each. I would play at being a Jedi at every new campground, waving around a tree branch like a lightsaber. But I remember being struck by the fact that in the end, it wasn’t Luke’s strength or skill with a lightsaber that made him a hero. He threw down his lightsaber, refused to fight, and was saved by his father’s love. His strength lay in his ability to empathize and love.

It wasn’t long after I started watching Star Wars that I began reading the Harry Potter novels. Harry rarely tried to solve his problems with violence, and when he did, it was always shown to be counterproductive and regrettable. He was ultimately able to defeat Voldemort not because he discovered a super powerful spell or became the best wizard ever, but because he understood the power of love better than Voldemort ever could. Harry cast a disarming spell, and Voldemort’s killing spell rebounded on himself. Voldemort was killed by his own act of violence.

Around the same time I was reading Harry Potter, I was watching Avatar: The Last Airbender. Aang was the most powerful kid in the world, the only person capable of bending all four elements. He spends the first three seasons mastering all of the bending styles in order to defeat the Fire Lord and save the world. But by the end of the last season, he begins to question whether it would be right to kill the Fire Lord, a man who committed genocide by killing Aang’s entire nation and plunged the world into a massive war. Aang solves this conflict creatively, refusing to kill the Fire Lord and instead learning an entirely new bending style to disarm him.

All of these characters had the ability and skill to solve their conflicts with violence, and they aren’t above fighting to defend themselves or others. Even the Doctor, who is held up as the ‘only nonviolent hero’ for boys, isn’t above using violence when there is no creative solution and his adversaries refuse to negotiate or back down ("No second chances. I’m that sort of a man"). 

But these heroes are more well known for their empathy, compassion, cleverness, and their desire to avoid resolving conflicts with violence. And they all share many traits in common with the Doctor. Hiccup is intensely curious about his world and is constantly trying to learn more. Luke tries to understand someone who most people assumed was fundamentally evil and gave him a chance to change himself. Aang is unironically enthusiastic about everything he encounters and isn’t afraid to show it, even if it makes him appear odd.

And Harry, who even years later is still in many ways the lonely boy in the cupboard under the stairs who would rather do whatever dangerous thing must be done alone, needs his friends. They keep him grounded, they keep him from brooding, and they encourage him to talk about what’s bothering him. He is better when they are around.

The Doctor is not the lone positive male role model for boys, he’s one of many. 

I’m not convinced that letting a woman portray the Doctor would “take away” this positive role model for boys. First of all, her presence wouldn’t negate the impact of the twelve men who preceded her. And I think such a regeneration would do a lot to challenge ideas about gender in media. It would teach young boys that certain character traits and behaviors aren’t inherent to any gender, but are learned. It would teach them that they can look up to women as their role models, instead of shaming them for doing so. 

So lets talk about how the Doctor does and does not defy traditional models of masculinity. Let’s talk about his value and importance as a character. Let’s talk about how the character of the Doctor can be a role model for little boys and little girls, regardless of gender. But let’s not hold the Doctor up as an ideal, dismiss and ignore other characters that don’t fit the traditional mold, and use this argument to derail conversations about whether the Doctor should ever be portrayed by a woman.

nowwearealltom:

whovianfeminism:

image

Sheree Folkson will be joining the crew of Doctor Who as the director of an episode in Series 8 written by Frank Cottrell Boyce

David Tennant fans might remember her as the director of The Decoy Bride and Casanova. Not much is known about the episode she will be directing, but it will apparently feature a fairly large cast of child actors.

Folkson joins Rachel Talalay as the second female director in Series 8. Prior to Folkson and Talalay joining Series 8, Doctor Who hadn’t had a female director since 2005. Doctor Who still has some work to do to increase diversity behind the scenes (female writers are still underrepresented), but Folkson and Talalay are welcome additions, and I’m truly excited to see their work!

This will be the first season of Doctor Who to feature the work of two female directors since 1983.

(Incidentally, the statement “Prior to Folkson and Talalay joining Series 8, Doctor Who hadn’t had a female director since 2005” is false, Hettie MacDonald directed “Blink,” Alice Troughton directed “The Doctor’s Daughter” and “Midnight”, and Catherine Morshead directed “Amy’s Choice” and “The Lodger”.)

Now that is a VERY interesting fact!

(Yes, I corrected that later. In my head I thought “Season 5, 2010,” and then I mixed up the numbers when I wrote them down. :P)

lovefishlove:

whovianfeminism:

whovianfeminism:

Hello to all of my lovely followers! If you love my content and want to help support my work, I want to encourage you all to check out my Patreon!
I love working on this blog, but it takes a lot of time, energy, and coffee to keep this running. And as you all know, it can be pretty darn expensive to be a Doctor Who fan. That’s why I need your support.
Patreon allows you to become my patron by signing up to donate money per blog that I publish. In return you’ll receive fun perks, such as access to early drafts of my blogs, special chat rooms to discuss the latest episode of Doctor Who, and even the opportunity to tell me to review any episode of Doctor Who, Classic or New!
Don’t worry, I won’t charge you for every single thing that appears on Tumblr. The only posts you’ll be charged for are the independent blogs written entirely by me, such as the episode reviews and the commentary on the fandom. No reblogs, no questions, no gifsets, no links. If you’re still worried I’ll have a sudden burst of productivity and will be churning out blogs left and right, you can set a monthly limit to ensure you’ll remain within your budget.
Check out my Patreon page for more information. Thank you so much for your support!

If you haven’t signed up to support me on Patreon yet, but you’ve been thinking about it, now would be a good time! Tonight I’m going to start posting first drafts of blogs I’m working on for my patrons to comment on! 

consider me  a patreon!

Thanks friend!

lovefishlove:

whovianfeminism:

whovianfeminism:

Hello to all of my lovely followers! If you love my content and want to help support my work, I want to encourage you all to check out my Patreon!

I love working on this blog, but it takes a lot of time, energy, and coffee to keep this running. And as you all know, it can be pretty darn expensive to be a Doctor Who fan. That’s why I need your support.

Patreon allows you to become my patron by signing up to donate money per blog that I publish. In return you’ll receive fun perks, such as access to early drafts of my blogs, special chat rooms to discuss the latest episode of Doctor Who, and even the opportunity to tell me to review any episode of Doctor Who, Classic or New!

Don’t worry, I won’t charge you for every single thing that appears on Tumblr. The only posts you’ll be charged for are the independent blogs written entirely by me, such as the episode reviews and the commentary on the fandom. No reblogs, no questions, no gifsets, no links. If you’re still worried I’ll have a sudden burst of productivity and will be churning out blogs left and right, you can set a monthly limit to ensure you’ll remain within your budget.

Check out my Patreon page for more information. Thank you so much for your support!

If you haven’t signed up to support me on Patreon yet, but you’ve been thinking about it, now would be a good time! Tonight I’m going to start posting first drafts of blogs I’m working on for my patrons to comment on! 

consider me  a patreon!

Thanks friend!

whovianfeminism:

Hello to all of my lovely followers! If you love my content and want to help support my work, I want to encourage you all to check out my Patreon!
I love working on this blog, but it takes a lot of time, energy, and coffee to keep this running. And as you all know, it can be pretty darn expensive to be a Doctor Who fan. That’s why I need your support.
Patreon allows you to become my patron by signing up to donate money per blog that I publish. In return you’ll receive fun perks, such as access to early drafts of my blogs, special chat rooms to discuss the latest episode of Doctor Who, and even the opportunity to tell me to review any episode of Doctor Who, Classic or New!
Don’t worry, I won’t charge you for every single thing that appears on Tumblr. The only posts you’ll be charged for are the independent blogs written entirely by me, such as the episode reviews and the commentary on the fandom. No reblogs, no questions, no gifsets, no links. If you’re still worried I’ll have a sudden burst of productivity and will be churning out blogs left and right, you can set a monthly limit to ensure you’ll remain within your budget.
Check out my Patreon page for more information. Thank you so much for your support!

If you haven’t signed up to support me on Patreon yet, but you’ve been thinking about it, now would be a good time! Tonight I’m going to start posting first drafts of blogs I’m working on for my patrons to comment on! 

whovianfeminism:

Hello to all of my lovely followers! If you love my content and want to help support my work, I want to encourage you all to check out my Patreon!

I love working on this blog, but it takes a lot of time, energy, and coffee to keep this running. And as you all know, it can be pretty darn expensive to be a Doctor Who fan. That’s why I need your support.

Patreon allows you to become my patron by signing up to donate money per blog that I publish. In return you’ll receive fun perks, such as access to early drafts of my blogs, special chat rooms to discuss the latest episode of Doctor Who, and even the opportunity to tell me to review any episode of Doctor Who, Classic or New!

Don’t worry, I won’t charge you for every single thing that appears on Tumblr. The only posts you’ll be charged for are the independent blogs written entirely by me, such as the episode reviews and the commentary on the fandom. No reblogs, no questions, no gifsets, no links. If you’re still worried I’ll have a sudden burst of productivity and will be churning out blogs left and right, you can set a monthly limit to ensure you’ll remain within your budget.

Check out my Patreon page for more information. Thank you so much for your support!

If you haven’t signed up to support me on Patreon yet, but you’ve been thinking about it, now would be a good time! Tonight I’m going to start posting first drafts of blogs I’m working on for my patrons to comment on! 

I have received several questions and comments related to the leaked scripts. All of you that have sent these messages have been very polite and have refused to send me spoilers until you knew whether I had read the scripts (thanks), but just to eliminate any confusion, I wanted to clarify my spoilers policy.

I will NOT be discussing any of the leaked scripts on my blog until AFTER their respective episodes have aired. This blog will be entirely spoiler-free. There have been problems in the past few days with some people attempting to deliberately spoil others or simply being careless about discussing spoilers. After an episode officially airs, the etiquette for spoilers becomes a bit more tricky (PBS’ Idea Channel dedicated an entire episode to the topic), but before an episode airs, the etiquette is very simple: SHHHHH. Many people simply don’t get the same enjoyment out of reading a script or watching a black-and-white, half-completed episode that they do out of watching a completed episode. Nobody can stop you from reading/watching the episode early, but respect those who want to wait for the finished product and be extremely cautious about how you discuss what you’ve seen. 

I have also decided not to read the scripts until after their respective episodes air, so please do not send me any spoilers. Those of you that have sent me messages so far have been very polite and thoughtful, so please don’t think I’m angry at you, but to keep myself safe I’m just going to have to declare a moratorium on the topic. Trust me, I’m dying to read the scripts too, but I realized that if I read them then I would very likely accidentally spoil others.

For future reference, I will occasionally make observations during an episode’s airing on Twitter or Tumblr, I will discuss and review the episodes shortly after they air, and I will discuss trailers and information which has been officially provided by the BBC before an episode airs. I will always tag episode reviews with the episode’s name so that you can block those posts.

Thanks everybody!

Or maybe you are just mad because the new Doctor isn't pretty anymore.
whovianfeminism whovianfeminism Said:

circular-time:

whovianfeminism:

circular-time:

whovianfeminism:

brilliantfantasticgeronimo:

LMAO

dude, what are you talking about, have you even seen the new doctor?

c’mon.

TROLL ALERT!!!

[cut for length]

4) Assuming the women watching the show are all young is ageist ;) 

I should clarify that the reason I specified “young women” in this post was because this type of panic is almost entirely directed at women in their teens and twenties…[cut for length]

Both good points. (And sorry, to be clear, I wasn’t accusing you of ageism, I was making a supplementary point rather flippantly).  Thanks for adding more thoughtful discussion after I jotted off a half-formed thought. :)

Ah, no, sorry, I didn’t mean to imply that I thought you were attacking me! You simply made me think more about the issue and how I should clarify the ageism stuff within my own post, and then I went on a tangent! I was a bit too flippant myself!